World Wetlands Day 2021: Wetlands as a source of freshwater

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 Chamiza. Photo: Gabriela ContrerasChamiza. Photo: Gabriela Contreras
 
 
By Caterinna del Río Giovannini
 
Every February 2, World Wetlands Day is celebrated as a reminder of the important role that these flooded terrestrial ecosystems have for life on Earth. This day also commemorates the date on which the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands was adopted in Iran in 1971.
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Restoring the Darwin's rhea to the Patagonian steppe

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Photo: Tompkins ConservationPhoto: Tompkins Conservation
 
By Caterinna del Río Giovannini

It is easy to misinterpret the conservation status of the Darwin’s rhea (Rhea pennata), a species that inhabits the wide and extensive Patagonian steppe of southern Chile and Argentina.

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Winter climbing on Devil's Fang

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 Photo: Victor AstetePhoto: Victor Astete
 
 
By Paula Fernández
Translated by Jesssica Thaxter
 
The Quinquilil volcano, also known as “Devil's Fang,” is a beautiful peak that shows its wilder side in the summer as it is renowned for being a highly difficult climb due to its unique formations of decomposed rock. Yet, winter is when it becomes a true challenge. That‘s when this spectacular stratovolcano standing at 2052 meters above sea level dresses up in all white to welcome the daring climbers who come to conquer its summit.
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Atlantic Salmon: opportunist carnivores roaming loose in the Patagonian sea

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By Tarsicio Antezana J.
Translation by George Chambers
 
Atlantic salmon (salmo salar) have been overexploited at the source and introduced to farms in the rivers, lakes and the Inner Sea of Patagonia without involving local communities or environmental impact studies being carried out. As a result of lax environmental and labour regulations, fish farming using cages has made this export industry very competitive and burdensome for its Chilean and foreign owners (especially those from Norway, Japan, Canada and China). It has left a clear mark on the environment and on the local communities, the so-called “expendable areas” and “by-products” of the industry. This environmental and social fallout has barely been documented by the Chilean State, by academics or by the aquaculture industry itself, but it has been persistently called out by the local communities, environmentalists and indigenous peoples.
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The San Pedro River and the sacred basin

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Kayakers at Salto La Leona, Fuy River. Photo: Salomé CandelaKayakers at Salto La Leona, Fuy River. Photo: Salomé Candela 
 
 
By Paulo Urrutia
Translated by Andy Ford
 
Our perception of reality is nothing more than the way in which we have constructed different kinds of lenses for observing it, based on experience with our environment. In order to understand what Río Sagrado (Sacred River) meant, we must be willing to change some of its pieces. It was a 7-day kayak expedition of 200 kilometers that lead us to the heart of Mapuche territory.
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